RE-BLOG WELLINGTON SCOOP: 60 trucks an hour: sleep disturbance and health issues during runway construction

by Lindsay Shelton, October 11, 2016. Link here. A report from the Wellington City Council identifies a “worst case scenario” if only trucks are used to carry the rocks needed to build a longer runway at Wellington Airport. The report, prepared by the council for the airport’s resource consent application, says that 252 people sent submissions that were concerned about traffic during the four year construction period, and 202 people were concerned about noise. The council report states: The Project has the potential to generate adverse noise effects given the scale of works proposed, the duration of the construction project, and the proposed night-time construction works. In addition, the Project proposes road haulage of fill during off-peak periods (9.30am-2.30pm, and 10pm-6.00am) during weekdays, which will generate traffic noise effects on properties along the haulage route. The applicant has provided a Construction Noise Assessment … which assesses the noise effects associated with constructing the runway extension, and the land-based transportation of construction materials (including fill) to the site. The report also identifies measures to mitigate such noise. A noise expert has reviewed the airport’s proposal and has found that The Project includes a construction duration of 48 months (or greater), and Read More …

RE-BLOG WELLINGTON SCOOP: Runway extension report: concerns on noise, environment, surfing, fishing

Link here. The Regional Council last week released a 165-page staff report analysing Wellington Airport’s application for permission to extend its runway. The report, on the airport’s resource consent application, confirms that of the 776 submissions received, 527 were against the runway extension, 227 were in support of it (either in full or in part), and there were 18 neutral submissions and four conditional. The airport is seeking permission for reclamation work to be carried out seven days a week, 24 hours a day. The proposed construction programme indicates that reclamation filling could take between 5 and 18 months depending on the source of material. The entire project will take up to four years. The report refers to 310 trucks per day taking loads from quarries to the reclamation site: Traffic emissions during construction will arise from trucks transporting fill material to the construction zones at the airport and construction vehicles at the airport construction site…The applicant considers that it is unlikely that there will be any measurable changes in vehicle related combustion emissions from 310 trucks per day…. [An expert] has advised that the covering of loads is “best practice and will satisfactorily mitigate potential fugitive dust over the Read More …

NEWS: Extending the runway: one truck every minute, for ten hours every day

by Lindsay Shelton The brutal reality of constructing a longer runway at Wellington Airport is revealed in one of the 27 reports that were published this week. It provides startling details of the number of trucks-with-trailers that will be needed to carry rocks through the city for the reclamation – one every minute, for ten hours every weekday. Starting at Ngauranga or Horokiwi, they’ll carry their loads on State Highway 1 through the city, for at least five months. State Highway 1 means that each truck and its trailer-load of rocks will go through the Terrace Tunnel and then along Vivian Street, Kent Terrace, and through Mt Victoria Tunnel. The report is written by a Christchurch company, who can’t have been aware of the mayhem that so many huge trucks will cause in these already over-loaded central streets. The information is in a report about “construction noise,” but it covers a much wider scope than just the noise: There could be in the order of 300,000 CuM (cubic metre) of rock and Akmons, 120,000 CuM of stone, 1.1M CuM of general fill, and 75,000 CuM of granular pavement material, plus materials to make 7,000 CuM of concrete and 23,000 tonnes Read More …

The Dominion Post: Rongotai homes disappearing

A home is moved from Bridge St, Miramar, as the airport removes properties in its noise zone. Houses in Bridge St are starting to disappear as Wellington Airport forges ahead with plans to remove 44 homes near its runway. One house had already been removed from the area in Rongotai and another was ”jacked up” on trailers, ready to be taken away. About nine houses along the street were now vacant and many more families were in the process of packing up. ”It’s sad that all our old neighbours have left,” said Bridge St resident Heather Courtney. “I lost a really good friend a couple of doors down.” In May, Wellington Airport announced plans to either demolish or sound-proof about 700 houses around it to mitigate future airport noise. The airport is allowed to emit up to 65 decibels, on average, over a 90-day period at its air noise boundary. It currently emits an average of about 61dB, but an independent study identified 44 houses in Bridge St where noise could exceed 75dB on average. The airport already owned half of those houses and gave its tenants six months to move out. It will extend an offer to purchase the Read More …

The Dominion Post: Airport plans may create ‘wasteland’

FORCED TO SELL: Bridge Street resident Heather Courtney. The Wellington Airport noise zone. Heather Courtney says her retirement plans were thrown into disarray by a letter in her mail box this week. The Bridge St resident is one of 22 home owners on the edge of Wellington Airport’s runway who were told the airport would offer to buy their homes because it could not mitigate noise to an acceptable level. Mrs Courtney and her husband Phil have lived in Bridge St since 1981 and have spent more than $50,000 renovating their house as a retirement nest egg. They planned to sell up in another seven years or so and retire to Nelson. They were aware the airport would eventually table an offer to buy their house before 2030, as foreshadowed in its master plan. But the couple figured they had another 15 years or so up their sleeve. And while that may still be the case, Mrs Courtney says the news this week that 22 houses around hers will begin disappearing as soon as next month, means she and handful of others will soon be living in a “wasteland”. That would decrease the visual appeal and safety of the street Read More …